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Most important person in the Allied victory?


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Sgt Becket FEAR #21 Posted 03 May 2015 - 05:24 AM

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The unknown soldier that history has forgotten.

Commander of Rosa "Queen of Hearts"

 

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FlukenJager #22 Posted 03 May 2015 - 07:05 AM

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View Postkiller etzi0, on 03 May 2015 - 01:31 AM, said:

What if the Japanese had not attacked the USA when they did? The leadership and feeling of the public at the time was to stay out of the conflict. Japan's strike on Pearl Harbor bought America full bore into the conflict.

 

Actually there were a lot of americans involved in the war before the nation it's self joined.

Americans for the most part still have very strong ties to europe individually and as families at this part of our history. It's not as much like that now.

 

Americans fought int he war as part of canadian and chinese forces for years before we joined.

So Im not sure exactly, how many americans felt we should stay out of the war.

 

Additionally, the German population in America at the time was pretty significant and A LOT of German Americans had sympathies for Hitler.

The jewish holocaust wasn't really known about in any significant way until almost the end of the war and many civilians didn't find out about it until years after...

 

America also had a very sizable Japanese population (mostly west coast) specifically in california and hawaii.

A little known fact is they were locked up in internment camps during the war, because authorities did not know what they would do.

 

It's not so much (at lest from what Ive read and been told) that america didn't want to get involved in the war, but that they were very divided in what to do and or what side to join.

Kinda hard to go fight a war when large portions of your population are from the places you want to fight….

 

What Pearl Harbor did, much like 911 attacks of modern era, is unite everyone on the common opinion of "oh hell no" not in my back yard!!

It was like a kick to the groin, out of nowhere.

 

However Japan (and Germany) had reasonably sound intelligence that america was going to get involved in the war very soon anyway.

American merchant marine ships ha been delivering supplies to russia and the UK for years and without american intervention on a non combat level, the soviet union and the uk would have fallen long before the events of pearl harbor. 



Matthew J35U5 #23 Posted 03 May 2015 - 12:44 PM

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View PostFlukeyHen7502, on 03 May 2015 - 02:05 AM, said:

 

Actually there were a lot of americans involved in the war before the nation it's self joined.

Americans for the most part still have very strong ties to europe individually and as families at this part of our history. It's not as much like that now.

 

Americans fought int he war as part of canadian and chinese forces for years before we joined.

So Im not sure exactly, how many americans felt we should stay out of the war.

 

Additionally, the German population in America at the time was pretty significant and A LOT of German Americans had sympathies for Hitler.

The jewish holocaust wasn't really known about in any significant way until almost the end of the war and many civilians didn't find out about it until years after...

 

America also had a very sizable Japanese population (mostly west coast) specifically in california and hawaii.

A little known fact is they were locked up in internment camps during the war, because authorities did not know what they would do.

 

It's not so much (at lest from what Ive read and been told) that america didn't want to get involved in the war, but that they were very divided in what to do and or what side to join.

Kinda hard to go fight a war when large portions of your population are from the places you want to fight….

 

What Pearl Harbor did, much like 911 attacks of modern era, is unite everyone on the common opinion of "oh hell no" not in my back yard!!

It was like a kick to the groin, out of nowhere.

 

However Japan (and Germany) had reasonably sound intelligence that america was going to get involved in the war very soon anyway.

American merchant marine ships ha been delivering supplies to russia and the UK for years and without american intervention on a non combat level, the soviet union and the uk would have fallen long before the events of pearl harbor. 

How? Lend-lease had hardly begun arriving in appreciable amounts by December of 1941. Maybe if Pearl Harbour was in December of 1942 that might be a reasonable statement. 


KeystoneCops, on 14 June 2015 - 12:51 PM, said:


Kev360X #24 Posted 03 May 2015 - 12:55 PM

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Most important person in the Allied victory?

 

My answer would be each individual that chose to / was conscripted to serve, I don't think any one person was important, it was many millions of regular people who were important.



TheDeadTANKer #25 Posted 03 May 2015 - 06:52 PM

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General George Marshall Would be my guess if I had to pick

GingerNinjaMax #26 Posted 05 May 2015 - 10:45 PM

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View PostFlukeyHen7502, on 02 May 2015 - 05:23 PM, said:

1) hitler wasn't that crazy…he was sick…. google the final stages of syphilis, he caught it during WW I as a corporal.

 

2) what if scenarios aren't that far fetched, there have been several well researched books written on it, the 'what if scenarios' came REAL close to actually happening especially since MOST of the technological advances of the 20th century made by russians and the US were scavenged/stolen from germany during the early occupation.

 

3) german generals complaining "hitler got in my way or I would have'…." is a pile… you can always say i could would shouldda and my idea would have worked when it's all said and done. Germany wouldn't even have BEEN in the position TO fail without Hitler, Himler, Gudarian and a select few.

 

it is difficult to pinpoint a single most pivotal person for the success of the ally victory anymore than trying to pinpoint who was the most pivotal in making the 911 attacks succeed.

It was a group effort and many people died making it happen.

 

Some of the people it wouldn't have happened without weren't even in high command…. people like 1st sergeant funk, omar bradley and jumping jim gavin.

 

I think it's pretty clear Montgomery was our hitler, we all would have been in berlin before the battle of the bulge had occurred had we just retired montgomery after africa.

 

How can you compare Montgomery to Hitler. What a disgracefull thing to say. Yes Monty made some questionable decisions but he also masterminded El Alamein. the campaign in Africa had huffed and puffed for ages before  Monty replaced Auchinleck.

 in September 1942 when Montgomery assumed command of the dispirited Eighth Army which had been pushed all over the western desert and humiliated by Rommel he said,"The bad old days are over, a new era has dawned." Issuing perhaps his most famous order, Montgomery ordered all previous plans for retreat to be burned. "We will fight the enemy where we now stand; there will be no withdrawal and no surrender. If we cannot stay here alive, then let us stay here dead!"

yes Market Garden was overall a failure but we still advanced in to Holland and broke through the German lines when there was a bit of a stalemate building, and it wasn't Monty that sat on his ar$$e at Anzio.

And you compare this good man to a racist mass murderer, with an obsession of meddling and macromanagement and of pure hatred and genocide megalomania.

Shame on you sir


Edited by GingerNinjaMax, 05 May 2015 - 10:46 PM.


Niles Y93 #27 Posted 06 May 2015 - 02:55 AM

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View PostMatthew J35U5, on 02 May 2015 - 07:38 PM, said:

Most of the 20th century's innovations such as:

Were invented by Nazi Germany. (And then stolen after occupation)

Hm. Struggling to fill in the blank there. Anyone want to take a shot?

 

Jet fighters (Messerscmitt 262, Horten 229)

 

V-2 rockets (which turned into to both ICBM's and rockets for space travel after the war)



Matthew J35U5 #28 Posted 06 May 2015 - 03:25 AM

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View PostNiles Y93, on 05 May 2015 - 09:55 PM, said:

 

Jet fighters (Messerscmitt 262, Horten 229)

 

V-2 rockets (which turned into to both ICBM's and rockets for space travel after the war)

Didn't realize that the Meteor, which first flew in 1943 was stolen after Germany was defeated. 

Von Braun was also working from Goddard's rocket concepts, stealing the Nazi rocket technology would shorten the development time of American and Soviet rockets, but it isn't reasonable to say it was invented by him. 


KeystoneCops, on 14 June 2015 - 12:51 PM, said:


Niles Y93 #29 Posted 06 May 2015 - 03:36 AM

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View PostMatthew J35U5, on 05 May 2015 - 10:25 PM, said:

Didn't realize that the Meteor, which first flew in 1943 was stolen after Germany was defeated. 

Von Braun was also working from Goddard's rocket concepts, stealing the Nazi rocket technology would shorten the development time of American and Soviet rockets, but it isn't reasonable to say it was invented by him. 

 

But did the Meteor ever see combat? (Sortie details here, jet-on-jet battles only. No V-1's.)

 

I wasn't saying it was invented by him, I was mentioning that it was, for lack of a better term, perfected to where space travel was actually possible. 



Matthew J35U5 #30 Posted 06 May 2015 - 03:46 AM

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View PostNiles Y93, on 05 May 2015 - 10:36 PM, said:

 

But did the Meteor ever see combat? (Sortie details here, jet-on-jet battles only. No V-1's.)

 

I wasn't saying it was invented by him, I was mentioning that it was, for lack of a better term, perfected to where space travel was actually possible. 

 

I fail to see how it is relevant whether the Meteor saw combat (idk, don't care to check). We were discussing things invented by the Nazis and stolen by the allies post-occupation. Neither fighter jets nor rockets fall into that category. 

KeystoneCops, on 14 June 2015 - 12:51 PM, said:


GingerNinjaMax #31 Posted 06 May 2015 - 09:43 PM

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View PostMatthew J35U5, on 03 May 2015 - 12:38 AM, said:

Most of the 20th century's innovations such as:

Were invented by Nazi Germany. (And then stolen after occupation)

Hm. Struggling to fill in the blank there. Anyone want to take a shot?

 


 Zielgerät-1229

 

 

 


 


 


 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

The Zielgerat 1229, also known as the Vampir Scope, was a revolutionary night vision attachment, designed to be fitted to the Nazis’ equally-as-revolutionary STG44 assault rifle. This basically gave soldiers equipped with the system the ability to see in the dark.

The Vampir Scope basically turned the solider into a unseen invisible, faceless enemy capable of killing people before they even knew he was there

 

The ZG 1229 Vampir weighed in at 2.25 kilograms (about 5 lbs.) and was fitted with lugs on the STG44. The soldier carrying the weapon  was known as a Nachtjäger (night-hunter). As well as the sight and infrared spotlight, there was a 13.5 kilogram (about 30 lbs.) wooden cased battery for the light, and a second battery fitted inside a gas mask container to power the image converter. This was all strapped to a Tragegestell 39 (pack frame 1939). The searchlight consisted of a conventional tungsten light source shining through a filter permitting only infrared light. It operated in the upper infrared (light) spectrum rather than in the lower infrared (heat) spectrum and was, therefore, not sensitive to body heat.

Found it on Wiki. good idea that predated the night vision scopes first seen really common place during Nam, but impractical as hell.

OR

Ruhrstahl-X-4

 the technology behind the X-4 that’s impressive, it’s what it represents.

Basically, the X-4 was a TOW missile. It was a controllable missile tuned to the vibrations of a bomber’s engine; in the right hands it could have literally changed the course of the war. Just imagine if they’d fitted this thing on one a Me262 that were too fast to catch. Though it was never used by the Nazis, the technology is the basis of what we use to take out enemy planes today.

 

 


Edited by GingerNinjaMax, 06 May 2015 - 09:49 PM.


CaliMeatWagon #32 Posted 06 May 2015 - 09:46 PM

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The soldiers who bled and died fighting the war.

 

View PostWGWPAIN, on 17 February 2015 - 04:21 PM, said:

Arty's are far from being unbalanced so there's no plans to nerf them.  Reducing the number of Arty's in high tier matches where they are the most powerful is something that we've considered but we're not seeing large number of Arty's being played in those matches.  Arty's are a way for players to play the game in a completely different way.  Some player only ever play Arty's so removing them is not an option.  I'd like to find a way to change the Arty viewpoint so its more realistic but that's one of those "some day" tasks I haven't gotten to yet.

 


WidowMaker1711 #33 Posted 06 May 2015 - 10:12 PM

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The most important person in the Allied Victory??

There isnt one.

For Russ and the Allfather

 

 


Matthew J35U5 #34 Posted 07 May 2015 - 11:07 AM

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View PostGingerNinjaMax, on 06 May 2015 - 04:43 PM, said:

 


 Zielgerät-1229

 

 

 


 


 


 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

The Zielgerat 1229, also known as the Vampir Scope, was a revolutionary night vision attachment, designed to be fitted to the Nazis’ equally-as-revolutionary STG44 assault rifle. This basically gave soldiers equipped with the system the ability to see in the dark.

The Vampir Scope basically turned the solider into a unseen invisible, faceless enemy capable of killing people before they even knew he was there

 

The ZG 1229 Vampir weighed in at 2.25 kilograms (about 5 lbs.) and was fitted with lugs on the STG44. The soldier carrying the weapon  was known as a Nachtjäger (night-hunter). As well as the sight and infrared spotlight, there was a 13.5 kilogram (about 30 lbs.) wooden cased battery for the light, and a second battery fitted inside a gas mask container to power the image converter. This was all strapped to a Tragegestell 39 (pack frame 1939). The searchlight consisted of a conventional tungsten light source shining through a filter permitting only infrared light. It operated in the upper infrared (light) spectrum rather than in the lower infrared (heat) spectrum and was, therefore, not sensitive to body heat.

Found it on Wiki. good idea that predated the night vision scopes first seen really common place during Nam, but impractical as hell.

OR

Ruhrstahl-X-4

 the technology behind the X-4 that’s impressive, it’s what it represents.

Basically, the X-4 was a TOW missile. It was a controllable missile tuned to the vibrations of a bomber’s engine; in the right hands it could have literally changed the course of the war. Just imagine if they’d fitted this thing on one a Me262 that were too fast to catch. Though it was never used by the Nazis, the technology is the basis of what we use to take out enemy planes today.

 

 

 

Night vision technology had parallel projects in the Soviet Union and Britain (I assume America did as well, but idk). 

Wire-guided missiles could be a possible candidate. 

KeystoneCops, on 14 June 2015 - 12:51 PM, said:


Mr Crowley ll #35 Posted 07 May 2015 - 02:55 PM

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Everyone and anyone involved in the capture and decoding of the two Uboat enigma machines between 1941 and 1943


 

 


GingerNinjaMax #36 Posted 07 May 2015 - 06:14 PM

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View PostMatthew J35U5, on 07 May 2015 - 11:07 AM, said:

 

Night vision technology had parallel projects in the Soviet Union and Britain (I assume America did as well, but idk). 

Wire-guided missiles could be a possible candidate.

 

  blueprints and formulas for making synthetic fuels,oils and rubbers etc  Wiki says "Indirect Fischer-Tropsch ("FT") technologies were brought to the US after World War 2, and a 7,000 barrels per day (1,100 m3/d) plant was designed by HRI, and built in Brownsville Texas. The plant represented the first commercial use of high-temperature Fischer Tropsch conversion"

does this make 2 items

 



Matthew J35U5 #37 Posted 07 May 2015 - 07:39 PM

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View PostGingerNinjaMax, on 07 May 2015 - 01:14 PM, said:

 

  blueprints and formulas for making synthetic fuels,oils and rubbers etc  Wiki says "Indirect Fischer-Tropsch ("FT") technologies were brought to the US after World War 2, and a 7,000 barrels per day (1,100 m3/d) plant was designed by HRI, and built in Brownsville Texas. The plant represented the first commercial use of high-temperature Fischer Tropsch conversion"

does this make 2 items

 

Unfortunately (to me anyway), the ability to turn coal into gasoline (&natural gas to longer-chain hydrocarbons) doesn't seem to be a much utilized invention in the world. So, while I don't think it would qualify as an "important 20th century invention" (i.e. invention important for the 20th century), it very well could qualify as one of the most important inventions of the 22nd century*. :P 

Looking long-term, lets go with a "yes" on that one. :P

*Unless we decide to finally start utilizing nuclear power as much as we can...


KeystoneCops, on 14 June 2015 - 12:51 PM, said:


GingerNinjaMax #38 Posted 07 May 2015 - 09:16 PM

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View PostMatthew J35U5, on 07 May 2015 - 07:39 PM, said:

Unfortunately (to me anyway), the ability to turn coal into gasoline (&natural gas to longer-chain hydrocarbons) doesn't seem to be a much utilized invention in the world. So, while I don't think it would qualify as an "important 20th century invention" (i.e. invention important for the 20th century), it very well could qualify as one of the most important inventions of the 22nd century*. :P 

Looking long-term, lets go with a "yes" on that one. :P

*Unless we decide to finally start utilizing nuclear power as much as we can...

 

All modern cars use synthetic engine oil. Very important inventions I would have said  The evolution of these technologies, matthew I would of thought that you would have known, is the ability to make bio fuels and indeed the most advanced version is to be able to make bio jet fuel. apparently. yawn yawn

Edited by GingerNinjaMax, 07 May 2015 - 09:19 PM.


Matthew J35U5 #39 Posted 07 May 2015 - 10:17 PM

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View PostGingerNinjaMax, on 07 May 2015 - 04:16 PM, said:

 

All modern cars use synthetic engine oil. Very important inventions I would have said  The evolution of these technologies, matthew I would of thought that you would have known, is the ability to make bio fuels and indeed the most advanced version is to be able to make bio jet fuel. apparently. yawn yawn

 

And there I was reading that this process was just used for Gas->Liquid transformations, mostly transforming coal/natural gas into long-chain hydrocarbons. Which, while interesting, is not very important with oil being relatively plentiful atm. 

I do think bio fuels are a bit pointless actually. If they aren't nukes, I'm not really interested. 

KeystoneCops, on 14 June 2015 - 12:51 PM, said:


GingerNinjaMax #40 Posted 07 May 2015 - 10:40 PM

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View PostMatthew J35U5, on 07 May 2015 - 10:17 PM, said:

 

And there I was reading that this process was just used for Gas->Liquid transformations, mostly transforming coal/natural gas into long-chain hydrocarbons. Which, while interesting, is not very important with oil being relatively plentiful atm. 

I do think bio fuels are a bit pointless actually. If they aren't nukes, I'm not really interested.

 

you read the wrong page. and if you turn over there is a bit on Bio Nukes. 100 megatons of cow sh!t




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